2x41: To Star Repeat 5 Forward 100 Right 144


#1

Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia present Bad Voltage, in which a proof through poetry is presented and utterly fails to move the audience, Red Hat maintains a ton of things, and:

Come chat with us and the community in our Slack channel via https://badvoltage-slack.herokuapp.com/!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_aWmmNKX6k

Download from https://badvoltage.org


#2

Mark Thomas

image

Still great live, rarely appears on radio and never on TV.

@sil, I was not aware you were involved in some of the “Serious Organized Criminal” events from that tour and DVD. We must have been at a few of them together. Were you at the one where PC Paul Macanally was given the application form for the protest iced into a cake?

For everyone else there are a few YouTube videos worth checking out.


#3

For the 2nd show in a row, @sil incorrectly stated there is not an API for G+.

https://developers.google.com/+/web/api/rest/


#4

The subject of DRM Digital Rights Management was raised in this episode and I would like to know what others think.

My attention to DRM came through music and I could not see any valid reason why I should not have the same music on several devices provided I applied the concept of ‘fair use’.

For example my car stereo has a Solid State Drive to store music on and a CD player that can be used to rip music to the drive. It also accepts USB memory sticks. I have most of my music ripped to a NAS dirive so can get the same music from multiple devices in my home and a portable device for when I am away.

This to me constitutes ‘fair use’ as no piece of music is likely to be played twice simultaneously and if it is, it will only be within the confines of my small family. Also if I decide I want to give a piece of music to someone else I can provided I either buy them their own copy or pass on my CD provided I don’t keep the copies on my network and elsewhere.

Unfortunately this not what has happened and too much music has been copied indiscriminately leading almost to the death of published music. I know lots of musicians who are not worried by this as they see it as an advertisement and if you don’t download say Ed Sheeran’s songs or by his CDs the fact you are listening means you are more likely to see him in concert where he makes more money.

The record companies see this differently however as they get less income so have less money to invest in new talent, ultimately providing worse music for us all and less profit for the shareholders.

Thoughts?

Books may have a similar arguments: If I buy a book I can pass it on when I am finished. The publisher has already taken their profit and the author has their commission so this is fair. If I buy it for my kindle, other e-readers are available, it is much more difficult if not impossible to pass on.

Finally other stuff: Printers insisting on own brand ink cartridges only, Cars that can only be properly serviced by main line distributors because the performance gets nobbled until you reset the service timer and only mainline distributors can do be this.

This may be worth a section on the show but lets here your thoughts first.


#5

My apologies. You are correct; there is an API. I think it’s useless and incomplete – it’s read-only, and only public data, and I have therefore ignored it in my thinking – but that’s not the same thing as it not existing, and I was wrong to say that without clarification.


#6

Yes, the grey area of what is right and what is legal. I agree that copying music, for whatever reason, for strictly personal use, constitutes fair use and is right. Is it legal? I’m sure it would be argued as no. In a similar situation, Nintendo sued over the use of roms, showing it to be illegal even if one owns the game.

What both disgusts and amuses me are the complaints of rap ‘artist’ who, while in their ‘art’ would promote killing law enforcement officers, other acts of violence including rape, and the basic demeaning of women, would complain loudly how wrong it is that people are stealing their work by pirating.


#7

Who are you buying music from that is still applying DRM to music purchases? Stop it inmediately and use someone less backward *cough*Apple*cough*


#8

I don’t buy music that enforces DRM but many sites try to.Possibly the reason still buy most of my music on CD or vinyl as opposed to downloads.


#9

It might be inconvenient, but vinyl is most satisfying!


#10

Seriously, what sites are these? Apple, Google, Amazon, Bandcamp, 7Digital, etc etc all offer DRM-free downloads in various formats, usually MP3 or M4A. I think Google restrict how many times you can download, but backups for the win.


#11

I don’t only listen to music in the English language. There are a few sites offering Thai music that do not offer DRM free music but I choose not to use these as DRM free is also available on other sites.


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